Your Intelligence Amplified

Quid is a platform that searches, analyzes and visualizes the world’s collective intelligence to help answer strategic questions.


I’m interested in

Innovation

Understanding Market Segmentation

Understand the current company landscape around digital health.

Previous
Next
Hone in on Specific Themes

Hone in on Specific Themes

Learn about specific companies within each theme.

Segmenting Info

Segmenting Info

Clusters represent themes broken down into smaller parts.

Content Clusters

Content Clusters

Quid organizes millions of private companies—each represented by a node—and organizes them based on their descriptions. Each colored cluster of nodes covers a particular type of company in the space.

Cluster Legend

Cluster Legend

Clusters are colored by topic and ordered in the legend according to the volume of content. Select a cluster to explore in it in more depth.

Scatterplot View

Scatterplot View

Map nodes on a scatterplot to see sectors plotted by whatever criteria you’d like.

Explore Over Time

Explore Over Time

See how investor behavior has changed over time.

Visualize Reach

Visualize Reach

Quickly understand investment patterns and trends.

Information Panel

Information Panel

A dashboard of information related to the selected topic, sortable by their original sources.

Identify Key Players

Identify Key Players

Every node represents a company. Some are more connected across the network than others.

Information Panel

Information Panel

Quickly learn about a company without leaving the Quid interface.

  • Themes
  • Topics
  • Scatterplot View
  • Growth
  • Investors

See how Quid can help answer

Communications

The Narrative Around Airbnb

Quid shows you topics that are most closely associated with Airbnb at any given time. By understanding the comprehensive public narrative around your company, you can devise a more effective communication plan.

Previous
Next
Content Clusters

Content Clusters

Quid reads millions of content pieces—each represented by a node—and organizes them visually by topic. Each colored cluster of nodes represents a particular topic.

Cluster Legend

Cluster Legend

Clusters are colored by topic and ordered in the legend according to the volume of content. Select a cluster to explore it in more depth.

Hone in on Specific Topics

Hone in on Specific Topics

Each node represents a single piece of content. Click on any to reveal more.

Information Panel

Information Panel

Explore a dashboard of information related to the selected topic including the number of stories, keywords and related companies.

Identify Key Points

Identify Key Points

Explore differences between what’s covered most in the media vs. what’s shared most on social.

Creating Correlation

Creating Correlation

The thicker the line, the stronger a company’s correlation to Airbnb.

See Where Competitors Stand

See Where Competitors Stand

Look for dense clusters of color to see which topics link you most closely with your competitors.

  • Network
  • Topics
  • Topic Popularity
  • Company Map
  • Competitors

See how Quid can help answer

Research

Speculation Around the Apple Car

Organize rumored developments tied to the Apple Car and examine them at scale. Pick up on weak signals based on what's been written so far.

Previous
Next
Content Clusters

Content Clusters

Quid reads millions of content pieces—each represented by a node—and organizes them visually. Each colored cluster of nodes represents a particular topic.

Cluster Legend

Cluster Legend

Clusters are colored by topic and ordered in the legend according to the volume of content. Select a cluster to explore in it in more depth.

Discover Activity

Discover Activity

See when mentions of the Apple Car project spike in the news, and reveal who spotted them first.

Identify Patterns

Identify Patterns

Analyze the news to see when certain topics spike.

Sort by Topic

Sort by Topic

Toggle on and off specific topics to see things more clearly.

Ranking Results

Ranking Results

Find out how much content has been written about each person.

Uncover Insights

Uncover Insights

Gain quick insight by exploring headlines.

Information Panel

Information Panel

A dashboard of information related to the selected topic including the number of stories, keywords and related companies.

  • Network
  • Timeline View
  • Patterns
  • Entity Extraction
  • Close-Up View

See how Quid can help answer

Trends

The Narrative Around Trends in Food Culture

Quid shows you topics trending in food culture so you can build better company strategies that are fully informed by all of the activity in the landscape.

Previous
Next
Content Clusters

Content Clusters

Quid reads millions of content pieces—each represented by a node—and organizes them visually by topic. Each colored cluster of nodes represents a particular topic.

Cluster Legend

Cluster Legend

Clusters are colored by topic and ordered in the legend according to the volume of content. Select a cluster to explore in it in more depth.

Hone in on Specific Topics

Hone in on Specific Topics

Each node represents a single piece of content. Click on any to reveal more. detail

Information Panel

Information Panel

Access a dashboard of additional information related to the selected content including the number of stories, keywords and related companies.

Sentiment View

Sentiment View

See what topics skew negative or positive.

Scatterplot View

Scatterplot View

Map nodes on a scatterplot across any two variables for a different viewpoint.

Edit View

Edit View

Play with axes, nodes, labels and links to reveal meaningful patterns.

Connecting Cities

Connecting Cities

See which locations are regularly mentioned together in the world of food culture.

Discover Hotspots

Discover Hotspots

See which places are mentioned most often.

  • Network
  • Deep Dive
  • Sentiment View
  • Press vs. Social
  • Locations

See how Quid can help answer

Now it's Your Turn

Take Quid for a guided test drive, personalized to your needs.

Get to know Quid. Chat with us for about 15 minutes about your project, and we’ll create a free guided test drive to help you find solutions.


Quid has changed the way we think through problems and questions.

John Suh

Executive Director, Hyundai Ventures at Hyundai Motor Company

+

I dream of Quid a lot, I really do. I’m fascinated with knowledge networks, the Quid engine and the physics behind it.

What gets me excited is how knowledge and information generated on the web is visualized in a way that gives you the big picture. We’ve become accustomed to searches where we only receive a fairly small subset of results. It’s really powerful to be able to capture all the information using Quid and then know how an individual idea or company relates to the bigger context.

In our effort to innovate and to do corporate venture capital, we generally use Quid in the beginning of any new project or initiative. By having one common starting point Quid saves our team a lot of time. It has also changed the way we think through problems and questions. Rather than just a list of companies with funding amount, Quid gives us insight through its visual representation of an emerging technology or set of companies. With Quid we quickly ask questions like, what are all the start-ups out there? What is the relationship between those companies? Which should we be interested in investing in?

You still have to make the assessments but with Quid you can make human judgments informed by the big picture and more insight.

x

Quid Clients

Quid in Action

See how today’s leaders are using Quid to make powerful connections and transform their industries.

Unboxing Quid

The world's leading strategists, researchers, investors and companies rely on Quid® to get a bird's-eye view of any topic and easily understand the trends impacting their world. See how it can work for you.

Learn More

Growing Global: Lessons for the New Enterprise


Given today’s global economy, and the unique challenges that come with it, business leaders must prepare themselves for the next phase of enterprise management. To advance how global organizations manage innovation and strategy, Quid user Peter Evans understands the value of new technologies. In his recent collaboration with The Center for Global Enterprise, Peter identifies advanced visualization, like Quid, as a fundamental tool for today’s executives. Below you will find an excerpt from their book, ‘Growing Global: Lessons for the New Enterprise,’ where he explores how and why visual analytics has grown in importance. For more insight into how contemporary corporations leverage strategic planning and competitive intelligence, read the full text on Amazon by clicking here.

Finding Strategic Insight Through Advanced Visualizations

by Peter C. Evans, PhD

A valuable tool, which is only growing in importance, is visual analytics. For years, charts, graphs and dashboards have been a standard way to synthesize and present data to managers and executives. Throughout history, there are powerful examples of graphics being used to advance business decision-making, some vivid examples of which have been captured and recorded in classic works like Edward Tufte’s The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. (Many of these were a labor of love and painstakingly drawn by hand.) In the 1970s and 1980s, hand renderings gave way to computer representations. A variety of stock graphics were introduced into spreadsheet programs. PowerPoint decks with a parade of graphics from bar charts to exploding pie charts became a ubiquitous feature of business meetings. While these software programs provided basic charts reasonably well, they had a variety of limitations — such as the inability to perform more advanced visualization and the limited amount of data the programs could manage.

In the past decade, there have been significant advances in developing more sophisticated visualization tools. This has partly been driven by need, as the flood of big data has overwhelmed traditional tools. It has also been driven by a focus on connecting a growing array of database architectures and handling more complex business problems. For example, there were more than 2.6 million patents filed in 2013 and over 8.7 million were in force worldwide, with a growing number coming from new geographies such as China.

Visual analytics provide a way to explore, discover, and understand not only the volume of patents but the growing complexity that arises from lawsuits, and counter-suits, claiming infringement of intellectual property. This is particularly true in rapidly changing areas such as smartphones. There is also demand arising from the growing complexity of other important business domain areas, such as supply chains, alliance patterns, and business ecosystems. Finally, senior management has been an important driver. Executives are requesting that their strategy teams provide more sophisticated visualization to support strategic planning.

Growth in advanced visual analytics has also been driven by rapidly improving capability. Innovations in computer graphics make it possible to visualize complex dynamics of firms — enhancing the ability to map out firms’ relation- ships with each other and drive strategy. Visualization techniques also enable management and analysts to explore, discover, and understand inter-firm networks for an enterprise, specific market segments or countries, and the entire business ecosystem.

In the past, these visualization techniques were only available as custom applications developed by skilled computer scientists. More recently, there have been a growing number of standardized commercial applications that are available to enterprises. These techniques have been used to differentiate the contexts and intents of the data to be visualized. New techniques and tools are also emerging that utilize exciting new visualization and animations to visually depict a story about data that far exceeds the standard charts, graphs, and dashboards. In the process, visual analytics can take data to the next step to support more sophisticated hypothesis generation, sense making, and discovery.

There has also been significant advancement in interactive visualization techniques. Instead of being limited to static graphics, interactive capabilities have introduced sophisticated ways for managers to navigate and analyze data. These navigational capabilities support a broader and more detailed view of the information. As a result, even users with little knowledge of a subject can quickly explore vast amounts of data from a wide range of perspectives. Users can also interact with interfaces or visualizations to perform a wide range of actions, including overviews, zoom, filter, search, compare, cluster, extract, order and reorder.
Dramatic advances in computing power have significantly increased the speed at which complex visualizations can be processed. Interactive visualizations have even greater advantages when they connect to data that is continuously refreshed. Visualization techniques can also build confidence in areas such as machine learning (advanced pattern recognition and prediction) by demonstrating how it works through interactive visualizations of the decision trees in action.

As an example, visualization can provide insight into the corporate venture activity of a company. Let’s take Google. With its investment activities having expanded dramatically, a number of questions arise: Where have these investments been made? What is the trend rate? Does investment flow to early or later rounds? What sectors are preferred? Where are these companies located? Visual analytics can provide a blend of rapid and comprehensive insights into these questions.

Google’s investment activities have ramped up significantly as the platform has grown. In the early 2000s, the company acquired four to five companies a year on average. Between 2005 and 2009, there were more than eight acquisitions per year, and between 2010 and 2014 the annual average was 22.

image005-1.png#asset:649

Google’s investments have covered a wide range of sectors — from payment systems, advertising and security to automation, artificial intelligence, and digital platforms. The graphic below shows these sector clusters for 250 companies. There have been investments in software companies such as SurveyMonkey, Xunleei, and DeepMind (an artificial intelligence company that Google subsequently acquired). There have also been a significant number of investments in various mobile companies, such as Apportable, which permits iOS applications (Apple) to run on Android (Google) devices automatically, without the need for changes to the underlying code. Google has also been a major investor in Uber.

While the graphic above is static, the interactive version of the data permits extensive exploration not only of macro trends but also microscopic perspective, with rapid drill-downs into the details of individual companies that have received funding. Through advanced visualization, it is possible to gain insights that would be extremely time consuming, or even impossible, if using traditional approaches.

Peter C. Evans is Vice President of the Center for Global Enterprise, and former Director of Corporate Global Strategy and Analytics for General Electric.


x

What do we know about the Apple Car?


Since the Wall Street Journal released a report in February 2015 indicating that Apple has been developing a vehicle under the codename ‘Project Titan’, quiet speculation about an Apple Car kicked into high gear. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire — and there’s a lot of smoke down in Cupertino.

A number of publicly available signals can help us understand Apple’s activities — news chatter, hiring trends, patent filings, investments & acquisitions, etc. For a company in the limelight like Apple, this could mean years worth of disparate data to sift through…what’s signal, and what’s noise? What’s new information, and what’s already known? We’ve turned to Quid to allow us to easily collect and identify trends emerging from these data sets. We’ve also collaborated with John Suh, the Director of Hyundai Ventures in Silicon Valley, to interpret these digital breadcrumbs and speculate what the future may hold.

So what do we know?

Quid analyzed the past two years of news mentions of the iCar or Apple Car — over 10,000 articles — to crowdsource intelligence on Apple’s activities. Using Quid we can visually display which events are widely reported, which opinions are outliers, and how the discussion changes over time. Hiring provides one of the clearest signals of intent for Apple, with 24% of the total speculation about the Apple Car focused on the acquisition of automotive talent.

Screen-Shot-2015-11-18-at-6.03.22-PM-100

The timing is right for a force like Apple to change the competitive foundations of the automotive industry. Consumer preferences are changing, particularly with younger drivers. Millennials have access to alternative transit methods, including improved public transit and car sharing services. Younger generations are balking at the traditional dealership-based car buying experience (‘Where’s my ‘buy it now button’?). Consumer expectations about what’s in a vehicle (and what creates value) is also changing as more and more of the perceived value in a vehicle shifts to software-driven features.

Some automotive executives have quickly dismissed the threat from Apple, like Dieter Zetsche,the CEO of Daimler saying “If there were a rumor that Mercedes or Daimler planned to start building smartphones then they [Apple] would not be sleepless at night. And the same applies to me.” One can’t help but compare this response to the early days of the iPhone, when the then CEO Mark Lazardus of RIM commented  “I couldn’t type on it [the iPhone] and I still can’t type on it, and a lot my friends can’t type on it…It’s hard to type on a piece of glass.”

The good news for the auto industry is that there is still time to act. Carplay is only just launching to the public. We don’t see signals (yet) indicating that Apple is thinking about sales, marketing & distribution. But there isn’t much time. Whether Apple launches a car or not, the tech giants have set their sights on the automotive market, and change is a-coming.

Selected analysis on the Apple Car available for download here.

What do we know about the Apple Car? from Quid Inc.

Further coverage of the analysis on MacWorld here

x

Now it's Your Turn

Take Quid for a guided test drive, personalized to your needs.

Get to know Quid. Chat with us for about 15 minutes about your project, and we’ll create a free guided test drive to accelerate your path to insight.


Quid helps us understand our positioning and create an effective strategy.

Aaron Bernstein

Senior Director of Insights and Advocacy, Walmart

+

As we scale Quid within the Walmart organization we are using the platform to help make business decisions within a range of groups. To maintain a competitive advantage, we have to leverage technology and data in all facets of our business including corporate affairs, advocacy, philanthropy, insights, communication, and advertising. We’re trying to build the best decision making system possible and Quid is part of this system.

With the democratization of data, and advanced machine learning, we can now bridge the gap between art and science, human and machine. Data becomes an asset, where Quid helps us remove the bias inherently present in how we interpret information. We use the machine as an additive to the art of communication and decision-making.

Rather than first looking inwardly at Walmart strategy, we now take an outward look first. By seeing the world more contextually, we really start to understand the correlation and connections between people places and things. Quid provides a layer of additional insights, and has really opened our eyes to trends we didn’t have access to before.

x

Quid Clients

Quid in Action

See how today's leaders are using Quid to make powerful connections and transform their industries.

Unboxing Quid

The world's leading strategists, researchers, investors and companies rely on Quid® to get a bird's-eye view of any topic and easily understand the trends impacting their world. See how it can work for you.

Learn More

Does anyone in the US care about paternity leave?


Netflix recently announced unlimited time off for new parents, no questions asked. What really caught my attention in the announcement is the concept of equal maternity and paternity leave. Balancing a career while raising a family presents many well documented challenges (thanks, Sheryl). In Lean In, Sheryl cites that “43% of highly qualified women with children are leaving careers or off-ramping for a period of time.” How can we reverse this exodus?

One obvious strategy is balancing the childcare responsibilities across both parents. Societal norms about gender roles are not going to change overnight, but one easy target is the treatment of maternity and paternity leave. Anecdotally, I’ve watched friends and colleagues struggle with how to maintain their professional momentum while taking time off for their newborns. For fathers, time off has the perception that it’s a “treat” (if you get time off at all). A little vacation before returning back to the real world. Because, what can a father do for a newborn anyways?

As I look at the announcement by Netflix, I’m naturally left to wonder, how bold is this step? Is this a marketing ploy to acquire better talent, or will Netflix parents actually take extended time off? Will a man taking a year of paternity leave be perceived any differently than his female colleagues? Will this lead to more women in upper management? Will other companies follow suit?

My curiosity piqued, I craved data to research this question (what can I say, I’m an engineer). And that’s when I turned to Quid. I used Quid to collect and analyze thousands of articles referencing paternity leave from the past two years. We can use the world’s collective intelligence to understand the public perception of paternity leave, how the discussion is changing over time, and who (or what) is influencing the debate.

Media interest is growing…but do consumers care?

I was pleased to find that the discussion about paternity leave is growing steadily over time. Two events in particular have driven spikes of attention: (1) Boomer Esiason criticizing baseball player Daniel Murphy for missing opening day for the birth of his son – the largest single event in the past two years – and (2) the recent Netflix and Microsoft announcements about new parental leave policies.

patternity2.png#asset:498

While the media may be giving paternity leave more airplay, the level of social amplification for these articles is quite low. Four of the top ten most socially shared articles were covering Prince William’s leave for the birth of Princess Charlotte. Scattered efforts by Sweden, Virgin, Netflix and Washington State to improve family leave benefits also saw some social lift. One highly shared article in particular caught my eye — the US Is Still the Only Industrialized Nation Without Paid Maternity Leave. The headline says it all.

patternity3.png#asset:499

Paternity leave is a big deal abroad, not in the US.

Digging deeper, we can break down the conversation into a narrative map, which clusters the thousands of articles about paternity leave into the distinct topics of conversation. In the map below, each dot represents an article, and the lines between dots indicate when two articles have highly similar language.

patternity4.png#asset:500

The first thing I noticed was how many times ‘paternity leave’ was used in reference to baseball and cricket players taking a leave of absence from a game, seen in the peripheral green clusters to the top right. Interesting…but not that informative.

Next, I dove in to the central narratives in the map and was struck by the strong presence of political efforts abroad to improve parental rights – 24% of the total conversation. Ireland, the UK, Sweden, Iceland, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, and Lagos are all leading the charge on paternity leave initiatives.
I learned that the Nordic countries have been working for decades to drive gender parity, and sit at the top of the World Economic Forum’s “Global Gender Gap Index.” In Sweden, parents are entitled to an astounding 480 days of paid parental leave. Even more remarkable, the society seems to have embraced the fact that childcare is not a “woman’s issue” – close to 90% of fathers in Sweden take paternity leave.

While parental rights in Ireland and the UK lag behind their Nordic brethren, the issue appears to be a hotly contested topic of debate, tightly coupled with national political races. Elsewhere in the world, paternity leave is cited as a potential solution for the low birthrates plaguing countries like JapanSouth Korea,Singapore and Hong Kong. Japan and South Korea have the two widest gaps between pay for men and women among developed countries, making them unlikely candidates for progressive family policies. However, when getting women back in the work could improve the GDP of Japan by 15%, the economics begin to trump the legacy societal norms.

In contrast, the US is largely underrepresented in the discussion. Obama’s Paid Leave policy in the US comprises only 9% of the discussion, and is completely disconnected from the debates raging around the world (seen from the distance between these clusters on the conversation map). I’m led to assume that family rights initiatives abroad are not tightly intertwined in the debate for the Paid Leave policy in the US, and vice versa. I expected that the 2016 presidential election might create a wave of interest in parental rights, and therefore paternity leave, but alas, no such narrative exists. If presidential candidates are addressing parental rights as a campaign issue, it isn’t in the context of paternity leave.


A handful of tech, financial services taking a stand

A limited number of companies in the past six months publicly announced support of extended parental / paternity leave. In June, Richard Branson announced that Virgin Management would allow up to one year of fully paid leave for selected new parents. Interestingly, Netflix announced a similar policy two months later and received nearly four times the press. Adobe, Microsoft, and Goldman Sachs have also announced more flexible family time. The response to these policies is widely supported as a positive step forward, but some skeptics wonder, will anyone actually take the time off? “Theory does not equal practice, and unlimited vacation policies don’t work,” cites a Business Insider article. Will parental leave fall into the same trap?

On the flip side, some companies have been brought into the discussion for less positive reasons. Amazon is cited as a key example of a company with a hostile corporate culture for new parents. Apple and Facebook have faced backlash in association with their offer to pay to freeze the eggs of female employees. Marissa Mayer’s intention to take just two weeks off from her role as CEO of Yahoo for the birth of her children has prompted dismay as well.

patternity5.png#asset:501


Mets player Daniel Murphy still the poster boy for paternity leave

We can also extract out the people mentioned in the discussion to understand the top influencers and opinion leaders.  I was surprised to see that Daniel Murphy, the baseball player, is still the most prominent figure associated with paternity leave, on the basis of unique article volume. The Daniel Murphy story broke in April 2014, and yet he still owns the largest share of voice. CNN journalist Josh Levs is a more recent champion for paternity leave, after suing his employer to get more paid time off for biological fathers. Fewer articles have been published about Josh, but they have been widely socially shared — clearly something in his story is piquing public interest.

patternity6.png#asset:502

The most prominent people in the conversation are global politicians. President Barak Obama the UK’s Nick Clegg have the largest share of voice in promoting parental leave legislation (the latter’s reforms more successful than the former’s). Some, like Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong or Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, have become unlikely sources of support.

Even more interesting than who’s leading the discussion is looking at who’s missing. Marissa Mayer and Sheryl Sandberg are brought in to the conversation as famous working mothers. Where are the famous working fathers? Corporate leaders need to promote cultural acceptance of family leave, and the acceptance will never set hold if men aren’t leading by example. Same holds true for political leaders in the United States. The fact that we are the only developed country without paid maternity leave is frankly embarrassing. This isn’t just a social issue, it’s an economic one – and we as a country have yet to give paternity leave the attention that it deserves.

Addendum (Nov. 23, 20:00 PT)

One day after writing this blog post, Mark Zuckerburg announced (on Facebook, of course) that he will be taking two months of paternity leave for the birth of his first child. The move has been met with widespread applause (although some question why he wouldn’t take the full four months offered to Facebook employees) and public interest, and a general acknowledgement that this “really matters”.

Initial analysis in Quid reveals that he will soon be the most widely discussed figure associated with paternity leave, surpassing Daniel Murphy. Here’s hoping the level of public interest holds, and that Zuckerburg can become a catalyst for systematic change.

x

How We Think About Diet and Weight-Loss


Our interest in losing weight stays consistent over time (no surprise there). But we gravitate toward different trends over time (goodbye garcinia cambogia) and view brands like Weight Watchers and Atkins differently. Check out this Slideshare for a preview of what we learned.

A better way to discover brand insights from Quid Inc.
x

Now it's Your Turn

Take Quid for a guided test drive, personalized to your needs.

Get to know Quid. Chat with us for about 15 minutes about your project, and we'll create a free guided test drive to help you find solutions.


Quid is a powerful tool for all strategy advisors.

Dr. David Dean

Former Global Head of Technology, Media and Telcommunications Practice, BCG

x

Quid Clients

Quid in Action

See how today’s leaders are using Quid to make powerful connections and transform their industries.

Unboxing Quid

The world's leading strategists, researchers, investors and companies rely on Quid® to get a bird's-eye view of any topic and easily understand the trends impacting their world. See how it can work for you.

Learn More

GMOs – The Great Divide: What Text Analytics Can Teach Us


Whether you’re a fervent believer that GMO-free food is needed in order to save our planet and health, or think that science and GMOs are critical to food security to feed the global population, you’re not alone. We often hear the dominant opinion on both sides of the debate, but what else is being said in the conversation? Given that it’s GMO month, we dove in.

Using machine learning and big data visualization in Quid, we are able to read through all the articles published around GMOs and genetically modified food in the US over 2015. Within a matter of seconds, we can see what the major conversations are in the GMO narrative.

GMO's & Consumer Food Trends (via Quid) from Quid Inc.

If you’re interested in learning more about what Quid can do for you around big data and to help answer your tough questions, feel free to reach out to me at slopez@quid.com.

x

Healthcare Influencers of 2015


2015: Year of Women Leadership?

Methodology: Analysis used Quid to algorithmically map massive amounts of information from disparate data sources and then determine influencers by measuring primary mentions of pharma, device, diagnostic, provider, and payor CEOs from thousands of global news sources in 2015.

Healthcare-Influencers-2015.jpg?mtime=20

x

Now it's Your Turn

Take Quid for a guided test drive, personalized to your needs.

Get to know Quid. Chat with us for about 15 minutes about your project, and we'll create a free guided test drive to help you find solutions.


Quid helps us understand movements in culture as they happen.

Marcia Roosevelt

EVP Global Planning Director, Saatchi & Saatchi

+

In our day, culture is critical for business relevance. To endear yourself with customers you have to take a stance on culture and what you believe in. By keeping our attention up on culture at Saatchi, we help our clients understand what actions they should be taking to better engage markets around the world.

Quid helps us understand movements in culture as they happen and enables us to have a conversation about how ideas move over time. Rather than just pecking and hunting for information, Quid lets us look at it all with a top down approach. Quid organizes the information differently so that you can quickly see the different component parts of your question rather than it all coming at you in a firehose. By understanding how big or connected certain areas are, you begin to understand the different dimensions of a particular topic.

There are tools galore that give you information or cull the Internet, but not a lot of tools that give you inspiration. And one of the things Quid gives us inspiration.

x

Quid Clients

Quid in Action

See how today’s leaders are using Quid to make powerful connections and transform their industries.

Unboxing Quid

The world's leading strategists, researchers, investors and companies rely on Quid® to get a bird's-eye view of any topic and easily understand the trends impacting their world. See how it can work for you.

Learn More

The 100 Year Human Revolution


There is something very special is happening right now. Within the coming decades, the applications of computing are going to drastically modify the way we look at the world and the way we communicate. These changes will fundamentally change not only how we think, but also what it means to be human.

The pivotal piece of these changes is language, which also happens to be fundamental to our interpretation of human intellect. We are in the midst of a revolution where we get to decide, what does it really mean to be human?

For example, think back to the year 1987. If you wanted to know something, you would need to have access to a library, be able to find the right book, and then maybe you could find the information you wanted. If it was possible, it could take you hours to learn one snippet of knowledge.

Today, you can learn almost anything within a 6-second recall. Now that we have constant access to multimedia via the Internet and our smart devices, we have the ability to communicate with hundreds of people in just a few seconds. As minds, we are no longer independent identities; we are now a collective identity.

To learn more about the evolving revolution, please watch Quid founder Bob Goodson’s full talk below. He gave this lecture titled ‘Augmented Humanity’ at the University of Oxford in May of 2015.

x

What Can Big Data Teach Us About The Internet of Things?


IoT-CES-Blog-Post.002.jpeg?mtime=2016010

CES kicks off today in Las Vegas which means for the next week our news feeds will be inundated with product announcements and new must-have gadgets ranging from drones to 4K TVs.  While many electronics categories have experienced rapid growth over the 48 year history of CES, no category has taken over the show as rapidly as the all-encompassing Internet of Things.  Whether it is the smart home, connected cars or wearable technology; we will see an unprecedented number of companies showing off products that collect and exchange data about ourselves and the world around us.  

With all the noise surrounding IoT it can be challenging to understand what is really happening in this ever-evolving space.  So I turned to Quid to help me look at the big picture.  Quid is a software platform that enables people to take whatever data is relevant to them and understand it more easily and thoroughly than ever before.  Quid’s web-based tool can read and visualize every article that has been published about IoT over the past two years to better understand the key players, emerging concerns, and how the conversation has evolved over time.  So what does big data teach us about IoT?

Security and Privacy Are Increasing Concerns

IoT-CES-Blog-Post.003.jpeg?mtime=2016010

Above you can see a network map made up of thousands of articles on IoT, where each dot or node is an individual news story.  Using Quid's similarity of language algorithms stories begin to cluster together and we are able to identify some high-level themes.  As one would expect the majority of the IoT conversation revolves around potential use cases for these devices and the underlying technology driving this revolution such as bluetooth and low-power chips.  What is surprising, however, is that a major part of the discussion is focused on security and privacy and these concerns are growing rapidly as IoT technology becomes more prevalent.

IoT-CES-Blog-Post.004.jpeg?mtime=2016010

Pivoting these stories into the timeline you see above, we can begin to see how this discussion has evolved since August 2013.  Immediately we see that shortly after the deluge of announcements from CES in 2015, there was a wave of privacy concerns driven in part by an FTC report discussing the benefits and risks of IoT.

Smart Home Is Leading the Charge But The Enterprise Is Rising

IoT-CES-Blog-Post.006.jpeg?mtime=2016010

While IoT is certainly overhyped, there is no doubt that the smart home is already a reality.  According to NPD’s Connected Intelligence team, the average U.S. Internet household now has over seven devices installed and connected.  Therefore, it is no surprise that close to 40% of the use case discussion focuses on smart home devices and applications driven by events like CES and companies like Samsung, Google and Apple.

IoT-CES-Blog-Post.005.jpeg?mtime=2016010

Despite the fact that smart home dominates the discussion, there are other IoT use cases that have risen over the past two years including Industrial IoT, enterprise applications and smart cities.  As we look deeper we learn that Cisco, IBM, and Intel are all playing major roles in the enterprise IoT movement and the launch of IoT cloud services from Amazon and Microsoft solidifies the role that these companies will play in securing and managing connected device data.

An IoT Communications Standard Has Still Not Emerged

IoT-CES-Blog-Post.007.jpeg?mtime=2016010

As we will see over the coming week at CES, there is no limitation to the amount of physical objects that can be embedded with sensors (remember last year’s connected egg tray?).  However, as is often the case with emerging technology, the market has yet to agree on a common communications framework for all IoT devices.  As you can see from the timeline below, standards have been a recurring theme over the past two years, peaking in mid-2014 when Intel and Samsung created the Open Interconnect Consortium.  However, despite all this talk, the industry has yet to agree on a unified series of protocols.  When an agreement does finally come, we can expect a dramatic increase in adoption of IoT devices and plenty of new players popping up at CES 2017 and beyond.

x

Get to know Quid. Chat with us for about 15 minutes about your project, and we'll create a free guided test drive to help you find solutions.

clear x